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Welcome to our "Children and Technology Issue"!



March 2014

Technology has really triggered an explosion of knowledge. My husband, John, and I have witnessed these changes in the way people communicate, learn and perform their jobs. We attended elementary school before television and computers were in use. Typewriters were the only modern machines we used in school (and that means high school!) To solve math problems, I used tables of logarithms. It wasn't until 1953 that I was introduced to a calculator.

When John was accepted at the U.S. Naval Academy, I gave him a slide rule for a graduation gift. Today, slide rules are in museums or sold on eBay as out-of-date artifacts. But in 1951 for engineering students, they were a must.

John also used a sextant in the Air Force to determine the location of his flight. He had to learn the constellations to do his celestial navigation. Navigation systems today are on your computer or your mobile phone. I wouldn't know how to get to most destinations without my talking phone telling me when to turn.

With all these advances in technology, education improves more and more. A new digital concept or invention seems to be introduced daily! Online enrichment programs for all ages and stages are available. Books come right to your Kindle. Home schooling has its best partner in computer technology. Likewise, taking college courses online opens doors for thousands of students. What wonderful opportunities we all have to be lifetime learners as a result of the vast technology available at our fingertips.

We hope you enjoy this issue of Indy's Child – dedicated to understanding the impact of technology on the lives of our young people.


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