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True Confessions of a Stay at Home Dad
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In May of 2011, I dismissed class for the last time and began a new chapter in my life, full-time dad. I taught middle school for seven years, but with two kids and a third on the way, I wasn't able to give as much time to teaching as it required, plus I wanted to spend more time with my own kids, instead of someone else's.

My wife and I have been married for nine years. She spends her days (and some nights and weekends) as an OB/GYN, or as my kids like to call it, “catching babies.”

We have three kids. First Born is eight years old, but likes to pretend she’s in college. Our son, Middle Man is five, but we’re convinced by the way he talks about things like “beautiful sunsets” that he’s an old soul, and our youngest, the Blonde Bomber is only three, but already has the attitude of a teenager.

Our kids provide us with an endless amount of stories. Writing and retelling these stories for Indy’s Child has been my part-time job for the past three years.

You can contact me on Facebook at True Confessions of a Stay at Home Dad or via email at indyschildpete@gmail.com.

Everyday Math
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Everyday Math

January 30, 2014 | 01:21 PM

My oldest daughter is in second grade. They just finished working on adding two, two-digit numbers together. Apparently the old way of doing things is no longer the correct way of doing things.

For example:

The "old" way

23

+12

____

35

Remember this? You started with the ones column and added those numbers together. If the answer was more than ten you carried the number into the tens column. Next you moved on to the tens column and added those together. That's how you got the answer. Simple and efficient.

Now let's take a look at the "new" way of doing things.

23

+12

_____

20 + 10 = 30

3 + 2 = 5

+___

35

When adding Partial Sums in Everyday Math you start with the largest column and work your way down to the smaller ones, essentially backwards from what was previously taught. It just seems like so much more writing and work.

I've just started to see this type of thing coming home for the past few weeks, so I admit, I'm VERY new to it. I'm curious what you think about this type of "new math." Whether you are a new parent with preschoolers, or a parent of a high schooler that completed Everyday Math all through elementary school I would love to hear your thoughts.

Thanks and wish me luck! I wonder what I'll have to relearn for tonight's homework?!?

-Pete


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